Brigitte Bardot’s Dressing Table

This picture, taken in 1973, shows Bardot sitting at her dressing table. Most of the bottles on it are decorative, but there are some real flacons too. On the right there are two Guerlain bottles. The white container decorated with a blue floral pattern is the refillable atomiser of Shalimar, while the fluted one is the spray version of Shalimar eau de cologne. Behind them, … Continue reading Brigitte Bardot’s Dressing Table

The French Line (1953)

Mame Carson (Jane Russell) is a millionairess with an oil empire and an unlucky love life. In the first part of the film she’s still engaged, though, and in the first musical act she’s getting ready to meet his fiancĂ©. She likes wearing working clothes but her boudoir shows her love for furry rugs, velvet and satin furniture and perfumes! There’s an impressive display of … Continue reading The French Line (1953)

Pose S02E03 (Butterfly/Cocoon)

There’s a flacon montre of Guerlain Shalimar cologne in the dressing room of the club where Candy works as pole dancer. It’s clear Ryan Murphy, Pose’s showrunner, is a fan of the Guerlain perfume: you may remember it was mentioned in American Horror Story: Hotel (it was Ramona Royale’s signature scent) and in American Horror Story: Roanoke (it was used by Lee Harris). Continue reading Pose S02E03 (Butterfly/Cocoon)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

When Dorothy and Lorelei get to Paris, they immediately go out shopping. One of the shops they hit is Guerlain. The screencap above shows the most famous fragrances of the French brand. There are three flacons montres of Shalimar eau de cologne and two of Mitsouko eau de cologne. There are five bouchon coeur bottles and two parquet boxes. There are also two chauve souris … Continue reading Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

An American in Paris (1951)

Jerry Mulligan (Gene Kelly) visits a perfume shop in Paris, where he first meets Lise Bouvier (Leslie Caron), who works there as shop assistant. In the screencap above, three bottles of Lucien Lelong Sirocco and a giant bottle of Elsa Schiaparelli Shocking can be seen. Sirocco was launched in 1934, while Shocking – a creation by Jean Carles – was launched in 1937. Lots of … Continue reading An American in Paris (1951)