Category Archives: perfumes in movies

Une belle fille comme moi (1972)

The bathroom where Camille (Bernadette Lafont) is sitting to apply nail polish on her toenails is full of interesting perfumes.

The first bottle on a shelf above the washbasin is Robert Piguet Cravache eau de toilette, a citrus fragrance launched in 1963.

Guerlain Habit Rouge eau de cologne in the red bottle sits on the same shelf. This version of the amber woody fragrance by Jean-Paul Guerlain was launched in 1965.

Habit Rouge eau de cologne in the clear glass bottle can be seen on another shelf behind Camille.

Other three perfume bottles can be seen in this scene.

On the washbasin shelf there’s Helena Rubinstein Men’s Club 52 eau de cologne.

A Chanel bottle on the second shelf. It’s impossible to read the front label, but it could be the Eau de Cologne Pour Monsieur.

Same location for Jean Patou Lacoste Eau de Sport in the metal canister. This fragrance, launched in 1967, was created by Jean Kerleo.

Thanks to lepetitcivet for the Patou id.

Shôri-sha (1957)

Eikichi (Tatsuya Mihashi) is on a date with his girlfriend Natsuko (Yōko Minamida) to celebrate her birthday. He takes a box out of his pocket and puts it on the table.

Lo and behold! It’s a Guerlain parquet box! First launched in the 1910s, this box contained MitsoukoFol Arôme and L’Heure Bleue in their bouchon coeur bottles. 

She’s opened it and…

… it’s Mitsouko! Unfortunately the actual bottle is never shown.

Sudden Fear (1952)

Myra Hudson (Joan Crawford), a successful playwright, finds herself in danger when her husband and a former girlfriend of his (Irene) devise a plot to kill her. But Myra fights back with a more elaborate plot.

When she breaks into Irene’s apartment, there’s a perfect perfume moment: on the girl’s dresser there are three Lucien Lelong bottles.

First from the left, the tall fluted bottle of Indiscret, a Jean Carles creation launched in 1936.

Then there’s the wonderful bottle of Opening Night, another Carles creation launched in 1935.

Last on the right, there’s a tall balloon bottle of Tailspin eau de cologne.

Tenebre (1982)

In one of the opening scenes the camera follows Elsa (Ania Pieroni) through the isles of a department store. In the meantime, many perfumes make their appearance.

First from the left, Chloé is shown, both boxed and unboxed. This white floral fragrance by Betty Busse was launched in 1975, when Karl Lagerfeld was at the helm of the French fashion house.

It’s not a coincidence that Lagerfeld Classic is shown in the same shot. There’s not only the perfume, but also the body lotion and the deodorant. This woody fragrance, created by Ron Winnegrad, was launched in 1978.

From this moment on, the audience literally steps into the world of Hermès: all the most famous fragrances by the Parisian brand are shown.

From the left, several spray bottles of Calèche, the Guy Robert fragrance launched in 1961.

On a shelf below, there’s also the refillable atomiser.

Moving from left to right, a display stand advertise the “new spray” atomisers, possibly containing the parfum de toilette version of Calèche.

Next, it’s the turn of Amazone, the Maurice Maurin fragrance launched in 1974. It’s shown in all the possible versions – eau de toilette in the splash bottle with dark red stopper, eau de parfum with the frosted glass stopper and eau de toilette in the atomiser. There’s also the body lotion.

The camera moves to the left and shows the complete Calèche display, which includes the splash bottle with satin ribbon bow and more refillable atomisers.

The camera is almost leaving this section of the store, so the image above is a bit blurry. There’s time to get a glimpse of another Hermès perfume, though: it’s Equipage.

It only appears in poster form, with an advertising image from 1978. This men’s fragrance, created by Guy Robert, was launched in 1970.

4 mosche di velluto grigio (1971)

Dalia (Francine Racette) has convinced Roberto (Michael Brandon) to take a bath. In his bathroom there are two perfume boxes, a prelude to the bottles which will be soon seen by the tub.

The large bottle with silverish gold stopper is Atkinsons English Lavender, a timeless fragrance which was very popular in Italy in those years.

When Dalia joins Roberto in the tub, we can get a better look at the other bottle, squared with black stopper.

It’s another fragrance by Atkinsons – the eau de cologne Executive.

Day Out of Days (2015)

The opening scene shows some of the beauty products used by the protagonist, the actress Mia Roarke.

From the left we can see a jar of Cetaphil moisturizing cream.

There’s a bottle of MCMC Noble fragrance, created by Anne McClain and launched in 2009.

Next, there’s Hamadi Organics shea leave-in moisturizing styling cream.

Next, a peachy pink blush by MAC.

Last, the small toppled-over bottle contains Mario Badescu drying lotion.

Thanks to my friend Jennifer for the screencaps and ids.

Sunset Boulevard (1950)

While perfume lovers and professionals still believe the urban legend according to which a bottle of Caron Narcisse Noir appears on Norma Desmond’s vanity (it doesn’t), no one has ever taken the time to see what’s actually on that table.

Well, I have and I love what I’ve found – three Lucien Lelong bottles!

Right under the round standing mirror on Norma’s left there’s a short bottle with bow-like stopper: it’s Jabot, launched in 1939.

If we move to the left side of the table, there’s a tall balloon bottle containing Balakaïka eau de cologne, launched in 1939.

When Norma stands up, we can see a golden bottle of Orgueil on a small table on the far left. This Jean Carles fragrance was launched in 1946.

I don’t think my passion for Lelong perfumes is a mystery: I’ve written about them many times and I find their bottle designs very distinctive and original. Seeing some of them on such an iconic dressing table really makes sense: it shows us that Norma Desmond is a fragrance lover and supposedly uses more than one fragrance, as shown by the several bottles sitting on the table (I haven’t been able to identify them all).

Now another question pops up: if we assume she is wearing a Lucien Lelong perfume in this famous scene, what perfume is it? Where does the infamous tuberose come from? It could be from Orgueil, which, according to Basenotes, includes tuberose in its heart notes, along with carnation, iris, jasmine, rose, clove and nutmeg.

Gli indifferenti (2020)

Lisa (Giovanna Mezzogiorno) and Maria Grazia (Valeria Bruni Tedeschi) have been close friends for a long time, but things are changing: Maria Grazia accuses Lisa of having an affair with her boyfriend.

The conversation they’re having in this scene is very harsh and unpleasant, but, by contrast, it takes place in a very chic and civilized setting – the perfume shop where Lisa works.

The perfume on the table in front of them is Xerjoff Casamorati Gran Ballo, which Maria Grazia will buy to wear at a masked ball later in the film. This white floral eau de parfum was launched in 2013.