Category Archives: bodycare in movies

Death Becomes Her (1992)

This is one of those posts that have been sitting in my drafts for a long time. I’ve recently got two requests to cover this scene (Madeleine emptying her white Chanel bag on the passenger’s seat of her car), so I guess the time to publish it has finally come.

The white jar with pink lid on the left is from the Christian Dior Hydra-Dior skincare line.

The gold tube is Estee Lauder Re-Nutriv hand cream (old packaging).

The white brush with black and gold handle is Le Fin du Fin sensational make-up brush by Lancôme.

The perfume bottle with sparkling stopper is White Diamonds by Elizabeth Taylor, a floral aldehyde fragrance by Carlos Benaim launched in 1991.

The jar with gold lid is another product by Lancôme. It probably contains a liquid foundation which I have no memory of, or maybe a moisturizer.

The lipstick in the red tube is Velvet Touch by Revlon (old packaging).

The lipstick in the white case looks like Clarins lipsticks from the 1990s. I’m not 100% sure of my ID but it’s my best guess.

Thanks to Alessandra and Ladiesofthepast for submitting this post.

Day Out of Days (2015)

The opening scene shows some of the beauty products used by the protagonist, the actress Mia Roarke.

From the left we can see a jar of Cetaphil moisturizing cream.

There’s a bottle of MCMC Noble fragrance, created by Anne McClain and launched in 2009.

Next, there’s Hamadi Organics shea leave-in moisturizing styling cream.

Next, a peachy pink blush by MAC.

Last, the small toppled-over bottle contains Mario Badescu drying lotion.

Thanks to my friend Jennifer for the screencaps and ids.

La femme d’à côté (1981)

Philippe (Henri Garcin) and Mathilde (Fanny Ardant) are a happy couple until they move next to a former lover of hers. By the end of the movie their relationship is still a thing, but jealousy and regrets don’t make it easy.

There are several interesting products in their bathroom. The aqua bottle with pink stopper, for example: even if I haven’t found any visual evidence, it’s a Jeanne Gatineau skincare item – a cleanser or a toner.

Not surprised to see a splash bottle of Lancôme Magie Noire: this fragrance, created by Gerard Goupy, Jean-Charles Niel and Yves Tanguy and launched in 1978, wonderfully suits Mathilde’s femme fatale character.

There’s also a Chanel bottle, which I believe contains a bath oil.

Last, there’s a square bottle by Lanvin. Even in this case, it’s impossible to read the front label. If we take the plot of the film into account, I like to think this is Rumeur, an Andre Fraysse creation launched in 1934.

Madame Sousatzka (1988)

There’s a glass bottle of Oil of Olay beauty lotion on a shelf in Jenny’s bathroom.

The green box on the same shelf contains Badedas bath gel, a gift that Jenny (Twiggy) receives from Ronnie.

The bottle on the washbasin is Vaseline Intensive Care lotion.

Thanks to Lee in the comments for the Vaseline id.

Le dernier métro (1980)

Marion Steiner is a strong woman: she’s the owner and leading actress of the Théâtre Montmartre in Paris during WWII. She’s also exceptionally beautiful and elegant, despite the harsh living and working conditions of that historical period. Still, it’s quite surprising to see an incredible array of Lanvin Arpège [1] products on her dressing table. This choice is historically accurate: the Lanvin perfume, created by Paul Vacher and Andre Fraysse, was launched in 1927.

Starting from the left, there’s a tall faceted bottle of Eau de Lanvin Arpège.

Next, two small bottles with square stopper of Arpège.

The only non-Lanvin product is Caron Narcisse Noir in the original bottle with engraved black stopper.

The black rectangular half-open box contains Lanvin Arpège soap. The packaging of the box seen in the movie is slightly different from the one above, though: the box in the movie has faceted – not rounded – edges.

The round box contains Arpège dusting powder.

Last, Arpège in the classic boule noire with ribbed stopper.

The same objects appear in a scene where Marion (Catherine Deneuve) is sitting at her vanity. In this case, another bottle of Eau de Lanvin Arpège can be seen in front of the mirror.

[1] Other Lanvin perfumes were launched before 1942 (year in which the film takes place) – Mon Péché in 1924, Scandal in 1931, Rumeur in 1934, Pretexte in 1937. The same bottles were used for most of them, so those seen on Marion’s table could contain one of them and not Arpège. Arpège was the most popular, though, so I guess it was easier to find in war times.

Demolition (2015)

Davis has a very busy working life and a very strict daily routine which includes beauty treatments. So it’s not surprising to see many toiletries in his bathroom. D. R. Harris Arlington mahogany shaving bowl is one of them.

On the washbasin counter there are more beauty items:

Sensodyne Original Flavor toothpaste

Tweezerman slanted tweezers in Midnight Sky Black

Pecksniff’s Almond & Shea moisturising hand and body lotion and nourishing hand wash in a metal rack

Baxter of California invigorating body wash in Flora and Cassis

Los abrazos rotos (2009)

Lena (Penélope Cruz) is a broken woman: trapped in an unhappy marriage, she desperately longs for freedom and real love. She lives in a luscious house, she’s always dressed elegantly, she’s surrounded by expensive objects, but all this rarely gives her joy.

Perfumes and beauty products follow her in many scenes, as if they were heavy trappings of a fake identity. The triangle-shaped bottle of Lancôme Trésor body lotion makes its appearance for the third time, so now I guess it’s safe to say that this is her signature scent. It’s an unusual choice, because I would see Lena wearing something more peculiar, with more personality, so I guess this is another way to force her into a role she doesn’t feel comfortable with.

In her bathroom there is also Givenchy Ysatis, a floral chypre fragrance created by Dominique Ropion in 1984.

Last, there’s L’Occitane Eau d’Iparie, an oriental woody fragrance launched in 2005.