Tag Archives: featured

Weird Science (1985)

Wyatt (Ilan Mitchell-Smith) and Gary (Anthony Michael Hall) are sampling perfumes at L. Magnin.

The refillable atomiser Gary is holding is Eau de Joy by Jean Patou, launched in the 1960s.

Wyatt is holding Cacharel Anais Anais, the romantic white floral scent created in 1978 by Roger Pellegrino, Robert Gonnon, Paul Leger and Raymond Chaillan.

The perfume counter displays other Patou perfumes – Eau de Joy in a splash bottle, 1000 in two sizes and a factice bottle of Joy in a black bottle with coral stopper. 1000, housed in a beautiful jade bottle, is a floral chypre perfume created by Jean Kerleo and launched in 1972. Joy, the “costliest perfume in the world”, was created by Henri Almeras and launched in 1930.

When the camera moves to the other side of the counter, other perfume bottles make their appearance. Right in front of the boys there are two Dior bottles.

The atomiser without stopper contains the eau de cologne version of Miss Dior, created by Paul Vacher and Jean Carles and launched in 1947.

The crystal bottle with brass stopper is kind of confusing: the front label looks white with dove grey details but it looks kind of pink, too. In any case, it’s the travel flacon containing the eau de parfum of Miss Dior (if we assume the front label is white) or Diorissimo (if we think it’s pink).

There’s also Pierre Balmain Ivoire de Balmain, another floral chypre fragrance, was created by Francis Camail and Michel Hy and launched in 1980. The white bottle was designed by Pierre Dinand.

Half hidden in one corner, there’s also Halston, housed in the Elsa Peretti-designed bottle. This creation by Bernard Chant was launched in 1975.

Thanks to Le Petit Civet who first wrote about perfumes in this scene.

Dix pour cent S04E03 (José)

There are several beauty products on José Garcia’s dressing table.

From left to right: a spray can of Doliderm spray thermal water.

Two bottles of Face and Body foundation by MAC.

A tube of Sothys Gommage Sublimateur Silhouette exfoliant.

A pump bottle of Sothys Lait Démaquillant Vitalité cleansing milk.

Impossible to read the front label, but it’s definitely a jar of Sothys face cream, possibly Crème Jeunesse Restructurante face cream.

Thanks to Scentimentalist for submitting this post.

Elsa Peretti’s House in Vogue US (1976)

In 1976 Vogue US featured Elsa Peretti’s New York apartment (the one she had taken over from Halston) on its pages. The photoshoot by Horst P. Horst portrayed the Italian artist in a minimalist space and focused on details too.

In her own words, the apartment had “bare bleached white floors, mirrored walls, lemon trees, banquettes covered in white Haitian cotton, white director’s chairs, and a work table,” which also functioned for dining and making up.

The aforementioned work table can be seen in the picture above: on it there are some pieces of jewellery, beauty items and a massive bottle that would be impossible not to notice.

It’s a factice of the famous teardrop bottle Elsa designed to house the first women’s fragrance by Halston [1]. Created by Bernard Chant and launched in 1975, the perfume would soon become a best seller.

The other two perfume bottles – both Joy by Jean Patou – tell us a lot about Elsa’s tastes. I had no idea she was a fan of “the world’s most expensive perfume”, the unique jasmine and rose fragrance launched in 1930. I can’t tell I’m surprised, though: Joy was perfect for her.

Another item I’ve identified is the Lancôme white tube. I think this contained hand cream, but it could also have been a face moisturizer.

The same table and the same objects are seen from a different point of view in the picture above. Elsa was wearing a wonderful vintage kimono she had bought in San Francisco.

Here she was doing her make-up which, according to the interview, consisted in foundation, Roger & Gallet face powder, blush, brown eye pencil and mascara. The dog posing in the picture was one of her two King Charles spaniels.

Another picture featured the beautiful gold and cobalt blue bottle of Guerlain Coque d’Or. It was created by Jacques Guerlain in 1937 and dedicated to Sergej Pavlovič Djagilev, the Russian impresario who founded the Ballets Russes. For its name Guerlain took inspiration from Le Coq d’or [2], the last opera by Nikolaj Andreevič Rimskij-Korsakov.

[1] The process of designing and making this bottle was accurately shown in the Ryan Murphy tv show Halston.

[2] In French “coque” means “shell”, while “coq” means “rooster”. The two terms are clearly related.

Death Becomes Her (1992)

This is one of those posts that have been sitting in my drafts for a long time. I’ve recently got two requests to cover this scene (Madeleine emptying her white Chanel bag on the passenger’s seat of her car), so I guess the time to publish it has finally come.

The white jar with pink lid on the left is from the Christian Dior Hydra-Dior skincare line.

The gold tube is Estee Lauder Re-Nutriv hand cream (old packaging).

The white brush with black and gold handle is Le Fin du Fin sensational make-up brush by Lancôme.

The perfume bottle with sparkling stopper is White Diamonds by Elizabeth Taylor, a floral aldehyde fragrance by Carlos Benaim launched in 1991.

The jar with gold lid is another product by Lancôme. It probably contains a liquid foundation which I have no memory of, or maybe a moisturizer.

The lipstick in the red tube is Velvet Touch by Revlon (old packaging).

The lipstick in the white case looks like Clarins lipsticks from the 1990s. I’m not 100% sure of my ID but it’s my best guess.

Thanks to Alessandra and Ladiesofthepast for submitting this post.

Sunset Boulevard (1950)

While perfume lovers and professionals still believe the urban legend according to which a bottle of Caron Narcisse Noir appears on Norma Desmond’s vanity (it doesn’t), no one has ever taken the time to see what’s actually on that table.

Well, I have and I love what I’ve found – three Lucien Lelong bottles!

Right under the round standing mirror on Norma’s left there’s a short bottle with bow-like stopper: it’s Jabot, launched in 1939.

If we move to the left side of the table, there’s a tall balloon bottle containing Balakaïka eau de cologne, launched in 1939.

When Norma stands up, we can see a golden bottle of Orgueil on a small table on the far left. This Jean Carles fragrance was launched in 1946.

I don’t think my passion for Lelong perfumes is a mystery: I’ve written about them many times and I find their bottle designs very distinctive and original. Seeing some of them on such an iconic dressing table really makes sense: it shows us that Norma Desmond is a fragrance lover and supposedly uses more than one fragrance, as shown by the several bottles sitting on the table (I haven’t been able to identify them all).

Now another question pops up: if we assume she is wearing a Lucien Lelong perfume in this famous scene, what perfume is it? Where does the infamous tuberose come from? It could be from Orgueil, which, according to Basenotes, includes tuberose in its heart notes, along with carnation, iris, jasmine, rose, clove and nutmeg.