Category Archives: stars’ vanities/make-up cases/cabinets in real life

Florence Welch Backstage at Gucci Bloom campaign

The British singer/songwriter Florence Welch recently shot a fascinating commercial for the Gucci Bloom advertising campaign. In a backstage picture we can see a bottle of Officina Profumo-Farmaceutica Santa Maria Novella toning water on a table near the artist.

The protagonists of the campaign by Floria Sigismondi are Anjelica Huston, Florence Welch, Jodie Turner-Smith and Susie Cave.

Stevie Nicks’ Tables

stevienicksyatch_bornunicorn
Stevienickspainting_bornunicorn

I’ve covered Stevie Nicks’ bathrooms and dressing rooms several times: I’ve always loved her music and style, so it’s intriguing to identify the beauty products and perfumes she uses in real life. Some time ago a reader of this blog submitted a couple of pictures from the 1980s I’d never seen before. In both of them, there’s a mysterious product (a tall plastic bottle with black cap) which I was asked to identify.

neutrogenabodyoil_bornunicorn

The product in question is one of the most popular products by Neutrogena, a body oil. The advert above shows the packaging in 1979. This is not the exact bottle seen on Stevie Nicks’ tables, though, because the cap has a different shape.

neutrogenabodyoil1980s_bornunicorn

The bottle shown in this advert from 1985 is more like it, even if I think the oil bottle seen in the second Stevie picture has a larger size.

In the first picture two Erno Laszlo bottles (lotion or Shake-It tinted treatment) can be seen as well.

Thanks to James for submitting this post and to Cédric for the id.

Brigitte Bardot’s Dressing Table

Wearing a scarlet red dress by Christian Dior, Brigitte Bardot was portrayed in her dressing room while getting ready to attend a gala in Munich in 1957.

rochasmouche_bornunicorn.pngThere were many beauty products displayed on the table but one has caught my attention: the teal lace box containing a bottle. If you’re a fan of vintage Rochas packaging, you’ve surely recognized Mouche, the Edmond Roudnitska creation launched in 1947. Rochas used the same bottle for many fragrances, but had different colours for their lace boxes – teal for Mouche, pink for La Rose, white for Femme, yellow for Mousseline.

Source.

Cecil Baldwin’s Dresser

cecilbaldwin_bornunicornCecil Baldwin, the narrator of Welcome to Night Vale podcast and host of Night Vale’s radio station, keeps several memorabilia of the popular podcast in his house. In the picture above, some perfumes can be seen too.

aesopfragrances_bornunicorn

farinacuirderussie_bornunicornAmong them, a fragrance by Aesop and Farina Cuir de Russie eau de toilette. This classic fragrance, also known by its German name (Russisch Leder), was launched in 1967.

Impossible to tell what Aesop fragrance sits on the dresser. The perfumes of the Australian brand are all housed in the same dark glass bottle, and the front side is not visible in the picture.

Thanks to A. Windfeldt for the id.

Picture source.

 

Christian Louboutin’s Bathroom

louboutinbathroom_bornunicorn

caronpourunhomme_bornunicornHave you ever wondered what perfumes celebrities wear in real life? I love watching pictures of their houses and bathrooms, because there’s always something interesting sitting on vanities, shelves and bedside tables.

Think of Christian Louboutin, for example. What perfume does the designer of the world-famous shoes à la semelle rouge wear? If you’re thinking about something unusual or incredibly exclusive, think again. A classic of French perfumery – Pour un Homme de Caron – can be seen in the beautiful bathroom of his French château. This perfume – with traditional notes of lavender, musk and vanilla – was created by Ernest Daltroff and launched in 1934.

Picture source.

Raffaella Carrà’s Dressing Room

In 1983 the popularity of the Italian showgirl Raffaella Carrà was about to peak: in that year she would start hosting Pronto, Raffaella?, one of the most successful tv programmes of the decade. Angelo Deligio took these wonderful pictures of Raffaella in her dressing room, surrounded by beauty products, personal items (see the Louis Vuitton Monogram Canvas box above) and design objects [1].

lancome_vintagetoniquedouceur_bornunicornThe first beauty products that have captured my attention are by Lancôme. Raffaella used the classic toner/cleansing milk duo: the toner is Tonique Douceur, while the cleansing milk is Galatéis Douceur.

maxfactor_panstikvintage_bornunicornBy the mirror there’s also Max Factor Pan Stik, along with a tiny bottle of Imidazyl eye drops and a box of Chicco cotton buds.

This picture was taken on the opposite side of the room. The Lancôme duo is still visible, but next to Raffaella there’s another intriguing bottle.

jeannegatineauvintage_bornunicornHere it is again. It’s a Jeanne Gatineau product, probably an oil make-up remover. The trademark pink packaging can be found in the first picture, too, where a pink box sits by the mirror.

evianspraywater_bornunicornIf we move to the opposite side of the room, next to Raffaella, there are other two products – Schwarzkopf Taft hairspray and Evian spray mineral water.

[1] In the pictures there are Ericsson Ericofon phone and Philips wired broadcast receiver.

Johnny Hallyday’s Dressing Room

Photographer Pierre Fournier portrayed the French singer and actor Johnny Hallyday in his dressing room at the Olympia music hall in Paris in 1965. The room walls are plastered with telegrams, while two interesting bottles sit on the table.

The bottle with the tiny bow around the neck is a classic: Eau de Cologne Fraîche by Christian Dior, a citrus fragrance created by Edmund Roudnitska and launched in 1955. Probably it was this cologne that started a life-long love story between the artist and the brand (he was the face of Eau Sauvage in 2000 and attended many Dior fashion shows).

The second bottle is from another staple of Parisian perfumery: Chanel. This huge squared bottle surely contained an eau de cologne. Not sure about the exact fragrance but, judging from the lettering on the front label, it may be Cuir de Russie, created by Ernest Beaux and first launched in perfume form in 1924.

Picture source.

 

Brigitte Bardot’s Dressing Table

This picture, taken in 1973, shows Bardot sitting at her dressing table. Most of the bottles on it are decorative, but there are some real flacons too.

guerlainshalimaratomiser_bornunicorn

guerlainvintagecolognenaturalspray_bornunicornOn the right there are two Guerlain bottles. The white container decorated with a blue floral pattern is the refillable atomiser of Shalimar, while the fluted one is the spray version of Shalimar eau de cologne. Behind them, the fan-like cap of the classic flacon chauve souris is visible, but it seems attached to a different bottle.