Pose S03E07 (Series Finale)

Pray Tell (Billy Porter) and Blanca (MJ Rodriguez) are getting ready for their performance at a ball. There are many products on the dressing table they’re sitting at.

The liquid foundation bottle with white stopper is Maxi by Max Factor.

The green jar with white lid is Pinaud Clubman styling gel.

There’s also a tube of Softsheen-Carson Magic razorless cream shave.

Next to it there’s a pump bottle of Palmer’s cocoa butter formula moisturizing hand wash.

Shôri-sha (1957)

Eikichi (Tatsuya Mihashi) is on a date with his girlfriend Natsuko (Yōko Minamida) to celebrate her birthday. He takes a box out of his pocket and puts it on the table.

Lo and behold! It’s a Guerlain parquet box! First launched in the 1910s, this box contained MitsoukoFol Arôme and L’Heure Bleue in their bouchon coeur bottles. 

She’s opened it and…

… it’s Mitsouko! Unfortunately the actual bottle is never shown.

Sudden Fear (1952)

Myra Hudson (Joan Crawford), a successful playwright, finds herself in danger when her husband and a former girlfriend of his (Irene) devise a plot to kill her. But Myra fights back with a more elaborate plot.

When she breaks into Irene’s apartment, there’s a perfect perfume moment: on the girl’s dresser there are three Lucien Lelong bottles.

First from the left, the tall fluted bottle of Indiscret, a Jean Carles creation launched in 1936.

Then there’s the wonderful bottle of Opening Night, another Carles creation launched in 1935.

Last on the right, there’s a tall balloon bottle of Tailspin eau de cologne.

Pose S03E05 (Something Borrowed, Something Blue)

After much toiling and suffering, the big break arrives for Elektra (Dominique Jackson), who finally gets to live the dream of a lifetime – living in luxury. The perfumes on her elegant dressing table reinforce the idea.

Maybe a bit predictable, but a glossy black refillable atomiser of Chanel No. 5 never fails to impress.

The second fragrance, in the small black bottle, is much less mainstream. It’s the original version of Shiseido Zen eau de cologne, created by Josephine Catapano and first launched in 1964. The bottle, beautifully decorated by gold flowers, has an elegant shape, characteristic of Shiseido bottles from the 1960s/1990s.

Tenebre (1982)

In one of the opening scenes the camera follows Elsa (Ania Pieroni) through the isles of a department store. In the meantime, many perfumes make their appearance.

First from the left, Chloé is shown, both boxed and unboxed. This white floral fragrance by Betty Busse was launched in 1975, when Karl Lagerfeld was at the helm of the French fashion house.

It’s not a coincidence that Lagerfeld Classic is shown in the same shot. There’s not only the perfume, but also the body lotion and the deodorant. This woody fragrance, created by Ron Winnegrad, was launched in 1978.

From this moment on, the audience literally steps into the world of Hermès: all the most famous fragrances by the Parisian brand are shown.

From the left, several spray bottles of Calèche, the Guy Robert fragrance launched in 1961.

On a shelf below, there’s also the refillable atomiser.

Moving from left to right, a display stand advertise the “new spray” atomisers, possibly containing the parfum de toilette version of Calèche.

Next, it’s the turn of Amazone, the Maurice Maurin fragrance launched in 1974. It’s shown in all the possible versions – eau de toilette in the splash bottle with dark red stopper, eau de parfum with the frosted glass stopper and eau de toilette in the atomiser. There’s also the body lotion.

The camera moves to the left and shows the complete Calèche display, which includes the splash bottle with satin ribbon bow and more refillable atomisers.

The camera is almost leaving this section of the store, so the image above is a bit blurry. There’s time to get a glimpse of another Hermès perfume, though: it’s Equipage.

It only appears in poster form, with an advertising image from 1978. This men’s fragrance, created by Guy Robert, was launched in 1970.

Halston E03 (The Sweet Smell of Success)

One of the most interesting scenes of the episode sees Halston (Ewan McGregor) and Elsa Peretti (Rebecca Dayan) going to Bergdorf Goodman to check how the newly-launched fragrance is doing. The sales assistant explains that it’s sold out.

There’s a huge bottle on the counter, but the prop masters have done something weird here: they put the glass stopper of the original Halston perfume on a bottle of Halston Couture, a fragrance launched in 1988 (two years before the designer’s death). The original bottle was all made of glass, while the other had accents of silver, stopper included.

This scene is not all about Halston, though: if we look behind Elsa and Halston, we can see a couple of factice flacons bouchon coeur by Guerlain. It’s impossible to know what fragrance they contain. Maybe Mitsouko?

When Halston and Elsa leave the room, we can see on a glass table a factice bottle of Guerlain Chamade, created by Jean-Paul Guerlain and launched in 1969.

Next to Chamade there’s a flacon montre of Shalimar eau de cologne, a trademark prop in many Ryan Murphy shows. The gold stopper is historically accurate because it was used between 1972 and 1979.

A growing archive of beauty products and perfumes in movies and tv shows