All posts by Born Unicorn

Pedantic archivist of beauty products in films and tv shows

Madame Claude (2021)

When Madame Claude (Karol Rocher) first meets Virginie (Liah O’Prey), she takes her into the office bathroom to teach her the general rules of personal hygiene.

On the washbasin there’s a Guerlain refillable atomiser of Shalimar.

Later, Madame is taking a bath in her own apartment. On a glass shelf above the washbasin there’s another atomiser of Shalimar, which means the classic fragrance by Guerlain is her signature scent.

Thanks to cedriceccentric for the id.

Un tranquillo posto di campagna (1968)

There are many bottles on Flavia’s dressing table: among them, the unmistakable green bottle of Victor Acqua di Selva, a classic fougère fragrance first launched in 1949.

The tall bottle with gold stopper on the right is Rochas Madame Rochas, a woody/floral creation by Guy Robert launched in 1960.

Moving to the far right side of the table, there’s a fluted bottle with silver stopper: it’s another Rochas perfume, Moustache. It’s unclear whether this bottle contained the eau de toilette concentrée (launched in 1948) or the eau de cologne (launched one year later, in 1949): in any case, the fougère fragrance was a successful creation by Edmond Roudnitska and Thérèse Roudnitska.

The Alfred Hitchcock Hour S01E12 (Hangover)

Jayne Mansfield starred in this episode as Marion, a girl the protagonist (advertising man Hadley Purvis) has taken home with him. He doesn’t remember anything about it because he is an alcoholic, so he has to reconstruct the events of the night before.

Mansfield, sporting a short hairstyle, posed for some on-set pictures in a bathroom. There are two intriguing bottles on the marble shelf behind her.

The tall ribbed bottle is Lanvin Eau de Lanvin. The prop masters replaced the original black bakelite stopper with an ordinary one.

The other bottle is by Lucien Lelong. Since the label usually wrapping the bottle neck is missing, we can make an assumption from the stopper: I think it contained Opening Night cologne.

Picture source.

Where’d You Go, Bernadette (2019)

Medicines, skincare and some make-up can be seen in Bernadette’s bathroom cabinet.

On the far left (top shelf) there’s a tube of Dr. Hauschka rose day cream.

I don’t usually cover medications, but this one was served on a silver platter: it’s Hyland’s muscle therapy gel with arnica

On the far right there’s a bottle of red nail polish by Butter London.

On the central lower shelf there’s a bottle of Klorane Eau de brillance à la cire de magnolia detangling spray.

The tall white bottle is Avène PhysioLift smoothing night balm.

Next to it, another Klorane product – Lotion florale démaquillante au bleuet apaisant, an eye make-up removing lotion.

La femme d’à côté (1981)

Philippe (Henri Garcin) and Mathilde (Fanny Ardant) are a happy couple until they move next to a former lover of hers. By the end of the movie their relationship is still a thing, but jealousy and regrets don’t make it easy.

There are several interesting products in their bathroom. The aqua bottle with pink stopper, for example: even if I haven’t found any visual evidence, it’s a Jeanne Gatineau skincare item – a cleanser or a toner.

Not surprised to see a splash bottle of Lancôme Magie Noire: this fragrance, created by Gerard Goupy, Jean-Charles Niel and Yves Tanguy and launched in 1978, wonderfully suits Mathilde’s femme fatale character.

There’s also a Chanel bottle, which I believe contains a bath oil.

Last, there’s a square bottle by Lanvin. Even in this case, it’s impossible to read the front label. If we take the plot of the film into account, I like to think this is Rumeur, an Andre Fraysse creation launched in 1934.

La Femme d’à côté (1981)

When Arlette (Michèle Baumgartner) tells her husband Bernard (Gérard Depardieu) that she’s pregnant, we can get a quick glimpse of some products she keeps in her bathroom.

Among them there’s a Guerlain zigzag box, first introduced in 1967. Unfortunately the name of the product is impossible to read; from the arrangement of the letters on the front oval it could be an eau de cologne.

Phoebe Bridgers’ Bathroom

The 63rd edition of the Grammy Awards took place on March 14th, 2021 in the middle of the pandemy that has torn the world as we knew it apart. I usually don’t care for these events, but I rejoiced at seeing this picture on the Instagram feed of the American singer/songwriter/guitarist Phoebe Bridgers, who got nominations in the Best Rock Performance and Best New Artist categories.

Besides the fantastic skeleton dress she was wearing (more about it later), I was attracted by the beauty products on the washbasin.

There are two bottles of pure-castile soap by Dr. Bronner’s in Lavender and Hemp Rose.

Another Dr. Bronner’s product can be seen on the soap dish: it’s the organic sugar soap in Lavender.

Last, a small can of Barbasol Soothing Aloe shaving cream is next to the castile soap bottles.

This dreamy Goth dress, designed by Thom Browne and featured in the spring 2018 collection, was paired to Ashley Zhang pearl earrings. Bridgers has often shown her love for the classic Halloween skeleton costume (it’s basically her trademark stage outfit), but the luxury version of it truly is a thing of beauty.