Tag Archives: hermes equipage

Tenebre (1982)

In one of the opening scenes the camera follows Elsa (Ania Pieroni) through the isles of a department store. In the meantime, many perfumes make their appearance.

First from the left, Chloé is shown, both boxed and unboxed. This white floral fragrance by Betty Busse was launched in 1975, when Karl Lagerfeld was at the helm of the French fashion house.

It’s not a coincidence that Lagerfeld Classic is shown in the same shot. There’s not only the perfume, but also the body lotion and the deodorant. This woody fragrance, created by Ron Winnegrad, was launched in 1978.

From this moment on, the audience literally steps into the world of Hermès: all the most famous fragrances by the Parisian brand are shown.

From the left, several spray bottles of Calèche, the Guy Robert fragrance launched in 1961.

On a shelf below, there’s also the refillable atomiser.

Moving from left to right, a display stand advertise the “new spray” atomisers, possibly containing the parfum de toilette version of Calèche.

Next, it’s the turn of Amazone, the Maurice Maurin fragrance launched in 1974. It’s shown in all the possible versions – eau de toilette in the splash bottle with dark red stopper, eau de parfum with the frosted glass stopper and eau de toilette in the atomiser. There’s also the body lotion.

The camera moves to the left and shows the complete Calèche display, which includes the splash bottle with satin ribbon bow and more refillable atomisers.

The camera is almost leaving this section of the store, so the image above is a bit blurry. There’s time to get a glimpse of another Hermès perfume, though: it’s Equipage.

It only appears in poster form, with an advertising image from 1978. This men’s fragrance, created by Guy Robert, was launched in 1970.

La stanza del vescovo (1977)

There are several bottles on the vanity in Charlotte’s bedroom, among which two Hermès perfumes.

One is on the left of the wooden table watch: it’s Equipage, the first masculine perfume released by the French fashion house. Created by Guy Robert, it was launched in 1970.

The other is on the right side of the dresser: it’s Calèche, another creation by Robert, launched in 1961.

If you’ve seen the film, or read the Piero Chiara novel of the same title, you’ll know there’s a problem with both of these perfumes: the story is set in the Lago Maggiore area in 1946, so the Hermès perfumes (launched decades later) are historically inaccurate. I understand why the prop masters chose them, though: they were popular when the film was made and their bottles are beautiful.

borotalco_vintagetinOn the vanity there’s also a tin can of Borotalco Roberts talcum powder.