Tag Archives: françois truffaut

La femme d’à côté (1981)

Philippe (Henri Garcin) and Mathilde (Fanny Ardant) are a happy couple until they move next to a former lover of hers. By the end of the movie their relationship is still a thing, but jealousy and regrets don’t make it easy.

There are several interesting products in their bathroom. The aqua bottle with pink stopper, for example: even if I haven’t found any visual evidence, it’s a Jeanne Gatineau skincare item – a cleanser or a toner.

Not surprised to see a splash bottle of Lancôme Magie Noire: this fragrance, created by Gerard Goupy, Jean-Charles Niel and Yves Tanguy and launched in 1978, wonderfully suits Mathilde’s femme fatale character.

There’s also a Chanel bottle, which I believe contains a bath oil.

Last, there’s a square bottle by Lanvin. Even in this case, it’s impossible to read the front label. If we take the plot of the film into account, I like to think this is Rumeur, an Andre Fraysse creation launched in 1934.

La Femme d’à côté (1981)

When Arlette (Michèle Baumgartner) tells her husband Bernard (Gérard Depardieu) that she’s pregnant, we can get a quick glimpse of some products she keeps in her bathroom.

Among them there’s a Guerlain zigzag box, first introduced in 1967. Unfortunately the name of the product is impossible to read; from the arrangement of the letters on the front oval it could be an eau de cologne.

Le dernier métro (1980)

Marion Steiner is a strong woman: she’s the owner and leading actress of the Théâtre Montmartre in Paris during WWII. She’s also exceptionally beautiful and elegant, despite the harsh living and working conditions of that historical period. Still, it’s quite surprising to see an incredible array of Lanvin Arpège [1] products on her dressing table. This choice is historically accurate: the Lanvin perfume, created by Paul Vacher and Andre Fraysse, was launched in 1927.

Starting from the left, there’s a tall faceted bottle of Eau de Lanvin Arpège.

Next, two small bottles with square stopper of Arpège.

The only non-Lanvin product is Caron Narcisse Noir in the original bottle with engraved black stopper.

The black rectangular half-open box contains Lanvin Arpège soap. The packaging of the box seen in the movie is slightly different from the one above, though: the box in the movie has faceted – not rounded – edges.

The round box contains Arpège dusting powder.

Last, Arpège in the classic boule noire with ribbed stopper.

The same objects appear in a scene where Marion (Catherine Deneuve) is sitting at her vanity. In this case, another bottle of Eau de Lanvin Arpège can be seen in front of the mirror.

[1] Other Lanvin perfumes were launched before 1942 (year in which the film takes place) – Mon Péché in 1924, Scandal in 1931, Rumeur in 1934, Pretexte in 1937. The same bottles were used for most of them, so those seen on Marion’s table could contain one of them and not Arpège. Arpège was the most popular, though, so I guess it was easier to find in war times.

Les quatre cents coups (1959)

Les quatre cents coups_bornunicornGilberte Doinel (Claire Maurier) uses a Carven perfume.

It’s impossible to tell which one (the front label isn’t visible), but four were the Carven perfumes released before 1959 – Ma Griffe in 1946, Robe d’Un Soir in 1947, Chasse Gardée in 1950 and Vert et Blanc in 1958.

carven_magriffe_bornunicorn

carven_robedunsoir_bornunicorn

carven_chassegardee_bornunicorn

carven_vertetblanc_bornunicornAll these perfumes had the same bottle.