Tag Archives: nina ricci l’air du temps

Raising Hell (2019)

The latest Kesha video is a fun one. The American singer plays a televangelist à la Dolly Parton, who’s unfortunately trapped into an abusive marriage with a horrible husband who doesn’t care about her and beats her up all the time. But she’ll soon know how to take her revenge on him. In the video, directed by Luke Gilford, there are two interesting scenes featuring beauty products.

In the screencap above, Kesha is in her dressing room; on her vanity there’s a can of L’Oreal Elnett Satin extra-strong hold hairspray.

But the most interesting moment is set in her house, where we can get a good look at her vanity.

The white fluted refillable atomiser is the super-romantic L’air du temps by Nina Ricci.There’s also the eau de toilette version of Pasha de Cartier, a fresh spicy men’s fragrance created by Jacques Cavallier and launched in 1992. I like to think the televangelist – not her husband – wears it.

Such an eclectic perfume selection wouldn’t be such without a blast of white flowers! So here is Vanderbilt by Gloria Vanderbilt, the 1980s best seller created by Sophia Grojsman.

Another nod to the past is the aqua green tube of Clinique lipstick, a packaging now sadly discontinued.

Thanks to Marco Ortolano for telling me about this video and for the Vanderbilt id.

 

The Death and Life of John F. Donovan (2018)


I think Xavier Dolan must have a thing for perfumes mothers wear. In his films, there’s often a moment in which the protagonist’s mother explains what perfume she’s wearing [1], so I guess this must have something to do with a personal obsession of the director. In this case, Grace (Susan Sarandon) is wearing Nina Ricci L’air du temps, the classic floral/spicy creation by Francis Fabron launched after WWII, in 1948.

[1] In Mommy, Diane says she’s wearing Christian Dior Eau Sauvage.

Sharp Objects S01E02 (Dirt)

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In Camille’s bathroom there are a lily of the valley soap gift set by Saponificio Varesino and a small, almost empty bottle of Nina Ricci L’air du temps. Judging from the dark colour of the perfume left, it must have been something she used to wear as a teenager, when she still lived in Wind Gap, or it could be Adora’s.

Belles Filles, 1977

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Belles Filles is a photoshoot by Guy Bourdin released in 1977. Some distinctive elements of the French photographer’s style are present in the picture above – the dreamy atmosphere, satin clothes, high heels – along with a beautiful set of famous perfumes.

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The first of the perfumes on the washbasin is Chanel No. 5, originally created by Ernest Beaux in 1921.
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Next is Revillon Detchema, released in 1953.

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Givenchy III, created by Jean François Latty and Raymond Chaillan, was released in 1970.

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The last one is Caron Infini, in the beautiful bottle by Serge Mansau. This perfume was created in 1912 by Ernest Daltroff, but this one is the 1970 reformulation by Gerard Lefortis.

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There are three bottles on the floor, too. The first is Nina Ricci L’Air du Temps, created by Francis Fabron in 1948.

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The tall bottle with gold stopper is Rochas Madame Rochas, created by Guy Robert in 1960.

guerlain_chamade_bornunicornLast but not least, the leaf-shaped bottle of Guerlain Chamade, a 1969 creation by Jean-Paul Guerlain.

Divine on Harpers and Queen (September 1980)

divine_harpersandqueens_bornunicornDivine having a bubble bath in a St. John’s Wood bathroom is such an entrancing view! The artist from Baltimore, protagonist of many iconoclastic films by John Waters, posed for Peter Warner for Divine Bathrooms, Lovely Loos, a photoshoot published on the British magazine Harpers and Queen (September 1980 issue).

ninaricci_lairdutempsfluted_bornunicornThere are some perfume bottles on the mahogany-panelled window by the tub. The first on the left is the amphora-like bottle of L’air du temps by Nina Ricci, created by Francis Fabron and launched in 1948.

courregesempreinte_bornunicornNext to it, Empreinte by Courreges, a fragrance created by Robert Gonnon and launched in 1970.

hermes_calechevintage_bornunicornI haven’t been able to identify the bottle with the white stopper next to it, but the small bottle on the right is definitely Hermès Calèche,  composed by Guy Robert in 1961.

yslopiumbodyveil_bornunicornNot only perfumes, but body lotions, too. The white bottle is Yves Saint Laurent Opium perfumed body veil.

avonvanityjar_bornunicornThe glass containers look like Avon vanity jars.

Do you want to channel your inner Divine? You need a ball dress by Zandra Rhodes to abandon on the floor, a box of Charbonnel et Walker chocolates, a shell ring by Andrew Logan and a platinum blonde curly hairdo. No results guaranteed but worth trying ♥

Picture source.

Étoile (1989)

ninaricci_lairdutemps_bornunicornninaricci_fleurdefleurs_bornunicornThere are two Nina Ricci perfumes on a dressing table: L’Air du Temps and Fleur de Fleurs. The first, launched in 1948, was created by Francis Fabron; the second, launched in 1982, was created by Betty Busse.

guerlain_chamade_bornunicornNext to them, on the left, there’s a bottle of Guerlain Chamade, a 1969 creation by Jean-Paul Guerlain.

Screencap source.

Jackie (2016)

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ninaricci_coeurjoie_bornunicornThere are two Nina Ricci perfumes on Jackie Kennedy’s dressing table in her bedroom at the White House. On the left there’s L’air du temps, created by Francis Fabron and launched after the WWII, in 1948. On the right there’s Coeur Joie, a white floral perfume, created by Germaine Cellier and launched in 1946; the cut-out heart-shaped bottle was designed by Marc Lalique.

Thanks to PaleBlueMoon for the L’air du temps id.

ABBA’s Dressing Room

abba_dressingroom_bornunicorn (1)A couple of weeks ago, my friend Raffaella went to Stockholm, where she visited ABBA The Museum. She sent me some awesome pictures of the band’s dressing tables, so let’s see what’s on them.

CacharelAnaisAnais_bornunicornOn the left, next to the metal suitcase, there’s a box of Cacharel Anaïs Anaïs, the ultra-feminine and romantic perfume created in 1978 by Roger Pellegrino, Robert Gonnon, Paul Leger and Raymond Chaillan. The yellow bottle next to it is probably a shampoo or a shower gel; the brand is LdB (Lait de Beauté), a very famous Swedish brand established in 1948.

elnetthairspray_vintage_bornunicornThere’s also the unmistakable golden can of L’Oreal Elnett Satin hairspray.

diorspraybottle_bornunicornNext to the hairspray, there’s the spray bottle of a Dior scent. The front label is not visible, so it’s impossible to tell exactly what perfume it is. It could be the Miss Dior cologne, the Eau Fraiche, Miss Dior eau de toilette, Diorissimo eau de toilette, or another Dior perfume who had the same bottle.

oilofolayvintage_bornunicornJust behind the glass, there’s a bottle of Oil of Olay moisturizing fluid.

angie-everhart-rive-gauche-yves-saint-laurent_bornunicornThere’s the beautiful royal blue, black and silver metal bottle of Yves Saint Laurent Rive Gauche, too. Created by Michael Hy and launched in 1971, it’s a floral aldehyde scent.

givenchyiii_bornunicornOn the far right there’s a bottle of Givenchy III, created by Pierre Dinand and launched in 1970 to celebrate the opening of the Givenchy store on 3 Avenue George V in Paris.

l'orealvintagelipstick_bornunicornIn the front row there are make-up products, among which a box of Kryolan false eyelashes and a Color Riche lipstick by L’Oreal. I’m not sure about this last id, though. L’Oreal lipsticks used to have a dark (aubergine?) case in the 1980s; ABBA’s last album, The Visitors, was released in 1981: had L’Oreal introduced the gold-case lipsticks yet? 

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vintageniveacreme_bornunicornninaricci_lairdutempsfluted_bornunicornOn another table we can see a tin box of Nivea Creme. Next to it, an amphora-shaped bottle with gold cap: this is Nina Ricci L’Air du Temps. Despite being famous for its twin-dove fluted bottle, the perfume (eau de toilette version) was sold in this more basic bottle in the 1970s and 1980s.

rochasmadamerochasspray_bornunicornThere’s also a spray bottle of Rochas Madame Rochas, a Guy Robert creation launched in 1960.

elizabetharden_vintagecompact_bornunicornThe black compact in the centre front row is an eyeshadow palette by Elizabeth Arden. There’s another black compact on the right: I think it’s by Yves Saint Laurent (see the red and black logo with gold lettering), but I personally have no memory of black make-up cases, only gold ones.

The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

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thesilenceofthelambs_bornunicorn (3)This is one of the most famous scenes from the Jonathan Demme film – the first time in which Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) and Dr. Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins) meet. His reaction to her presence is eerie: there’s a thick perspex surface separating the two characters, but he is able to detect, through the holes in the perspex, what she smells like. He smells “Evyan skin cream”; he also realizes she sometimes wears Nina Ricci L’air du temps, “but not today”.

evyanwhiteshoulderslotion_bornunicornLet’s focus on the first product for a moment: the script spells it “Evyan”, not “Evian”, so Thomas Harris (the author of the Hannibal saga) was referring to a perfumed body lotion, not to a French mineral water-based product. By “Evyan” I believe he was referring to the American brand’s most famous perfume, White Shoulders. Originally launched in 1945, it is a triumph of white flowers: it includes notes of gardenia, jasmine, lily of the valley, orange flower and tuberose. Since he mentions L’air du temps soon after, I think it’s natural for him to talk about two perfumes, not about a (probably scentless) face moisturizer and a perfume.

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The second reference is pretty clear: Clarice sometimes wears the iconic perfume by Nina Ricci, created by Francis Fabron and released in 1948, a symbol of innocence (see the beautiful doves on the stopper). Among its middle notes, we can find jasmine and gardenia, so can we assume Clarice loves white floral perfumes?