Tag Archives: guerlain flacon montre

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

gentlemenpreferblondes_bornunicornWhen Dorothy and Lorelei get to Paris, they immediately go out shopping. One of the shops they hit is Guerlain. The screencap above shows the most famous fragrances of the French brand.

vintage-guerlain-shalimar-eau-de-cologne-splash-1-7-oz-new-rope-sealed-7cc19a1fb031c4c8f019950e9bc5749a (1)

guerlainmitsoukocologne_bornunicornThere are three flacons montres of Shalimar eau de cologne and two of Mitsouko eau de cologne.

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guerlainparquetbox_bornunicornThere are five bouchon coeur bottles and two parquet boxes.

shalimarvintagead_bornunicornThere are also two chauve souris bottles of Shalimar.

voldenuit_guerlain_bornunicornLast but not least, two flacons rayonnants of Vol de Nuit and three zebra-printed boxes.

Id source.

Carroll Baker’s Dressing Table (1960s)

carrollbaker_bornunicornItalian photographer Pierluigi Praturlon portrayed actress Carrol Baker in the 1960s.

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balmain_joliemadame_bornunicornOn her dressing table two perfumes can be seen: one is a Guerlain cologne in the trademark glass flacon montre, the other is a Balmain perfume. It’s impossible to read the front label: it could be Vent Vert, but I think it’s Jolie Madame.

Thanks to Barbara Herman for the Balmain id.

Picture source.

The Danish Girl (2015)

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guerlainmitsoukocologne_bornunicornThere are several bottles of Guerlain colognes at the department store where Lili (Eddie Redmayne) works. The movie is set in the 1920s, so the choice of flacons montre with a glass stopper is not historically accurate: these were first launched in 1937. The teal disk on the bottle on the right is reminiscent of Mitsouko.

Totò, Peppino e la… malafemmina (1956)

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guerlainmitsoukocologne_bornunicornThere’s a Guerlain flacon montre on the dressing table of the showgirl Marisa Florian (Dorian Gray). There’s no way to know what cologne the bottle contained: the disk label can’t be read and the black and white of the film doesn’t help. In any case, the choice is historically accurate: the bottle with the glass stopper was produced from 1936 to 1972.

Thanks to my friend Rocco for the id.

Mr Selfridge S01E03

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mrselfridge_s01e03_bornunicorn (4)The dressing table of Rose Selfridge (Frances O’Connor) is quite busy. She’s clearly a fan of Guerlain perfumes: two flacons montre [1] can be seen on the shelf in front of the window, but there’s more. She opens a Guerlain box, decorated with people and animals, and takes out a flacon bouchon coeur, the bottle with the heart-shaped stopper designed by Raymond Guerlain in collaboration with Baccarat. It would be easy to assume this is Après l’Ondée, created by Jacques Guerlain in 1906, but it’s not, because that perfume has never had that bottle. It would have been a historically accurate choice (this episode takes place in 1909), but prop masters opted for something different. The flacon bouchon coeur originally contained three perfumes, released between 1912 and 1919.

guerlain_vintagefolarome_bornunicornFol Arôme was created by Jacques Guerlain in 1912. Grace Hummel found a reference of this perfume being sold in 1896, so the 1912 version would be a reworked or relaunched perfume.

guerlain_vintagelheurebleue_bornunicornL’Heure Bleue was created by Jacques Guerlain in 1912. I don’t think this is the perfume seen on Rose’s dressing table because of the blue lettering on the central sticker.

guerlain_vintagemitsouko_bornunicornThe last possibility is Mitsouko, one of the most famous perfumes by the French brand. Another creation by Jacques Guerlain, it was launched in 1919, ten years after the time in which the tv show is set.

My guess is that the perfume seen in this episode is Fol Arôme, because the pale orange decorations on the sticker seem to match.

[1] The flacon montre was first released in 1936. The presence of these bottles in this episode is totally inaccurate, but no one can deny their decorative function.

Source.

La caduta degli dei (1969)

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guerlainflaconmontre_aromablog_bornunicornThere’s a Guerlain flacon montre on the top shelf on the left in Elisabeth Thallmann‘s (Charlotte Rampling) bathroom. I can see no central disc on the bottle, so it’s impossible to tell what cologne it contained. In the same film, Sophie Von Essenbeck used Shalimar and Mitsouko colognes.

Romy Schneider’s Dressing Table (1973)

20463I’ve recently come across an extraordinary set of Romy Schneider’s pictures taken by photographer Helga Kneidl in 1973 in Paris. The Austrian actress was portrayed while sitting at her dressing table. Who knew she was a Guerlain fan? I shouldn’t be surprised: I’ve realized the fragrances of the French maison have always been incredibly popular among celebrities and prop masters (just think of all the Guerlain perfume sightings you can find on this site).

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guerlainflaconbouchoncoeurThe first bottle I’ve spotted is the iconic Flacon Bouchon Coeur, designed by Raymond Guerlain and Baccarat and first released in 1912. It’s hard to tell what exact perfume was on the actress’ table, because this bottle has been used for Mitsouko, L’Heure Bleue, Fol Arome and a special edition of Shalimar.

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RL-30731.2LThere are also two Travel Flacons, first launched in 1955 to contain Ode and later used for several colognes. The bottles on Romy’s table have the white rim, so they surely contained feminine colognes.

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montre-bottlesLast but not least, on the right you can see a Flacon Montre with gold screw-cap stopper, first used in 1936 with Cachet Jaune. It contained all the standard feminine colognes, each of which was characterised by the colour of the central disk (red for Shalimar, navy blue for Vol de Nuit, burgundy for Jicky, light aqua for Chamade and so on). Unfortunately, the pictures I’ve found are black and white, so it’s impossible to tell which cologne Romy wore.

All the information of these bottles come from the invaluable Guerlain Perfumes, From Past to Present blog.

Picture source [1] [2].